Alien Abduction Advent Calendar Day 4: Gaelic

21 Days Until Christmas
22 Days Until Abduction

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Early in his investigation of the abduction phenomenon, Whitley Strieber came upon fairy lore that held hints of visitor involvement with mankind, reaching back through the centuries. He wondered, was it possible that the visitors had been interacting with us throughout our history, hiding their presence in our myths and legends? This was a notion addressed by ufologist Jacques Vallee in his book Passport to Magonia, and it has been explored by many historians of UFO lore.

Strieber was struck by a detail in the Welsh tale of Little Gitto, a boy who was spirited away by the fairies and returned to his mother two years later, looking the same as he did when he disappeared. The boy had with him a paper garment that he said the fairies had given him to wear while he was in their realm, and this fairy artefact so disturbed Little Gitto’s mother that she promptly dropped it into the fire. Strieber found this fascinating, because the visitors had dressed him in a papery, robe-like garment during an abduction that occurred in April 1987.
He was also intrigued by the findings of Leonard Keane, a researcher who attempted to decipher the strange language the late abductee Betty Andreasson Luca spoke under hypnosis on at least one occasion. Keane examined a phonetic rendering of her words and concluded she was speaking Gaelic, a language Betty did not know. He painstakingly translated this chilling message:

“The living descendants of the Northern peoples are groping in universal darkness. Their/My mother mourns. A dark occasion forebodes when weakness in high places will revive a high cost of living ; an interval of mistakes in high places; an interval fit for distressing events.”

Lady Gregory, the friend and patroness of William Yeats, collected modern accounts of fairy encounters in rural Ireland. She once interviewed a Mrs. Sheridan, who claimed the fairies often took her to their home. “What language had they?” Lady Gregory asked her.
Mrs. Sheridan replied, “Irish, of course – what else could they talk?”

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